Noob Cook Recipes



What's
New
Summer Rolls Recipe Pumpkin Soup in Pumpkin Bowl Recipe Teh C Peng "Special" Recipe Gula Melaka (Palm Sugar) Sambal Quail Eggs Recipe Braised Ee-Fu Noodles Recipe

Sukiyaki (Japanese Beef Hot Pot)

   

Sukiyaki Recipe

Check Out: Shabu Shabu Recipe

Sukiyaki (鋤焼/すき焼き) is a Japanese dish in the nabemono (Japanese hot pot) style. It consists of thinly sliced beef with other ingredients such as tofu, negi, mushrooms, jelly noodles and cabbage. The sauce is made up of sake, mirin, sugar and soy. When eating, Japanese often dip the ingredients in raw beaten egg. Cooked udon or soba is added at the end to soak up the remaining broth. It is extremely easy to whip up at home and a perfect dish for beginner cooks. It’s always quite expensive when one orders it at Japanese restaurants with a few measly slices of beef, so making it at home is affordable (with better quality of beef) and effortless.


Cooking with Dog video for Sukiyaki on YouTube

Recently, I have been hooked on cooking Japanese, largely because I was inspired by Cooking with Dog, a cooking channel on YouTube. The tagline of the show reads “It’s not what you think” – i.e. it’s not cooking with dog meat, but cooking with a dog as your host – the videos are narrated by a male poodle named Francis in perfect Japanese-accented English. While the chef (a human, in case you are wondering) is demonstrating how to cook the dish, Francis sits obediently behind the counter as he “voice overs” the steps of cooking. He sounds earnest and sincere with encouraging words such as “It’s so easy, even a dog can do it” (aww). With so many cooking videos out there, trust the Japanese to be one step ahead in terms of creativity in their presentation to stand out among the rest. Of course, this wackiness will not hold on its own had the recipes not been rock solid good – the steps are clear and the dish is always beautifully presented. I felt so inspired that I finished  all the videos within 2 days. The first dish I tried out was this Sukiyaki.

                                           

Leave a Comment





33 Responses to “Sukiyaki (Japanese Beef Hot Pot)”

  1. HoppingHammy — March 10, 2011 @ 12:11 am

    Your ingredients always look so fresh….like you just plucked them from the garden and put them in the pan! So beautiful wiffy!

    Reply

  2. Maria @ Scandifoodie — March 10, 2011 @ 8:23 am

    Delicious! My half-Japanese bf would adore this dish and so would I! ;-)

    Reply

  3. food-4tots — March 10, 2011 @ 8:26 am

    A very comforting soup perfect for cold weather! This soup is full of nutrients and flavour. It’s always my favourite choice! ;)

    Reply

  4. Xiaolu @ 6 Bittersweets — March 14, 2011 @ 1:52 pm

    I made a terribly simplified version of this once for my boyfriend who lived in Japan for a year. I think he’d enjoy this one much more. Looks fantastic!

    Reply

  5. grace — March 19, 2011 @ 12:12 pm

    hi
    may i know where u get this pot? i went to isetan scott but could not find it

    Reply

    • Cooking Mama replied: — September 15th, 2011 @ 4:05 pm

      Hi Wiffy, just to check Phoon Huat @ Pandan Loop sells the Japanese pots? I thought they are selling bakery stuff instead? I was looking high and low in Singapore for these pots… my old pots were bought from Tokyo !!! If they are indeed sold in Singapore I would be so delighted !

      Reply

  6. Moosemousse — September 12, 2011 @ 5:23 pm

    Thanks for this recipe. I made it this evening for dinner.

    Reply

  7. dawn — November 26, 2011 @ 12:53 pm

    hi!may i know wherecan i get the shirataki noodles?

    Reply

    • wiffy replied: — November 26th, 2011 @ 8:22 pm

      hi, I saw them at Sakuraya Fish Market, Singapore

      Reply

  8. jas03 — April 10, 2012 @ 5:37 pm

    thanks for sharing, your site is inspiring!

    Reply

  9. Gina — May 26, 2013 @ 2:55 pm

    Hi , can I use it as a steamboat broth by adding some water?

    Reply

    • wiffy replied: — May 27th, 2013 @ 3:41 pm

      yes, you can though I personally think this tastes as a one-pot meal rather than a Chinese-style steamboat base.

      Reply