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Luo Han Guo Herbal Tea

   

Luo Han Guo Herbal Tea Recipe

Check Out: Watercress Soup with Luo Han Guo Recipe

My mum treated me to a spa session some time back and one of the most memorable thing that happened (besides the massage, of course) is that they served a cup of delicious, home-brewed luo han guo (arhat fruit/monk’s fruit/罗汉果) herbal tea  (罗汉果凉茶) during the session. Maybe I haven’t been to many spas, but nowadays I seldom see them serving home-made drinks. According to my mum, they brew herbal teas every morning to serve their customers. Maybe it’s psychological, but I do feel healthy and refreshed drinking it especially coupled with the massage. So I decided to try making my own herbal tea at home.

Luo Han Guo (Monk's Fruit)

Previously, I have used the fruit to cook with watercress soup whenever I have a sore throat. This herbal tea is easier to make and I can make it more regularly than the soup as a healthy herbal drink and thirst quencher. I also added a little of two of my favourite ingredients for herbal drink – namely American ginseng and chrysanthemum flowers. They complement the luo han guo well and make the drink extra cooling and delicious.

                                           

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47 Responses to “Luo Han Guo Herbal Tea”

  1. daphne — September 21, 2010 @ 8:13 am

    I love it when u feature simple yet traditional chinese drinks/recipes. It’s like giving it a modern feel all over again. This is what my grandma used to make every other week. I love how refreshing it is especially when it is cold.

    Reply

    • wiffy replied: — September 21st, 2010 @ 6:55 pm

      thanks for your kind words daphne. I like to chill the leftovers and the next day, enjoy it chilled. It’s extra refreshing like you said :)

      Reply

  2. 3hungrytummies — September 23, 2010 @ 11:33 am

    This is my favourite drinks…beautiful photos as usual!

    Reply

  3. Julie — March 14, 2011 @ 11:46 am

    do you use the skin of the fruit as well? or just the insides with the seeds?

    Reply

    • wiffy replied: — March 14th, 2011 @ 1:02 pm

      Hi Julie, I used the entire smashed luo han guo (skin and insides).

      Reply

  4. bonnie blosat — February 7, 2012 @ 5:20 am

    where can I purchase the monk fruit tea or the dried fruit? I have heard that it is very helpful when one has neck radiation and need it soon! Thanks.

    Reply

  5. karen — August 14, 2012 @ 8:22 am

    I have an older Chinese neighbor who heard me coughng and came over to tell me about this tea. We do not speak each other’s langauge but she was able to use gestures to describe what to do with this fruit. I made the tea and tried it since I have heard remarkable stories of Chinese herbal remedies. This tea helped immediately and has been the only thing that has worked for me. The Dr. I saw dismissed as a virus but gave no ideas as to relief. I am very blessed to have this lady as my neighbor.
    Thank you for the recipes, I will enjoy trying some of them I am sure

    Reply

  6. Jennifer — August 23, 2012 @ 3:13 pm

    where to buy the soup bag?

    Reply

  7. wan mulyadi — October 5, 2012 @ 11:17 am

    tea dewa., rasa nya khas beda dengan tea lain,.aroma khas minum tea ini membuat rasa badan jadi lebih baih juga rasa yang saya kira tidak perlu di tambah dengan pemanis gula kasna rasa manis nya alami., ya dia ada hemmm original tea sebenarnya dari dewa tea.

    Reply

  8. Yvonne Killeen — November 5, 2012 @ 7:21 am

    Hi, I would like to buy a box of LoHanKuo. Do you knopw where I can get it? Thank you

    Reply

  9. mark — November 19, 2012 @ 7:01 am

    I like mixing with my daily yin tonic. As we get older yin depletes and we dry up like prune.

    Thank you.

    Reply

  10. Lina Lee — December 3, 2012 @ 7:05 pm

    Hi, I’m Lina Lee from Indonesia and would like to ask, why couldn’t we boil chrysanthemum flowers as long as we boil lohanguo?

    My family members love lohanguo and chrysanthemum flowers but usually I prepare them separately, lohanguo tea or chrysanthemum tea. It should be a good idea to mix them both.. Thanks..

    Reply

    • wiffy replied: — December 4th, 2012 @ 2:40 am

      Hi Lina, it’s not advisable to simmer chrysanthemum for too long, as it may result in a bitter taste. Check out my chrysanthemum tea recipe at http://www.noobcook.com/chrysanthemum-tea/, where I only simmer for a few minutes.

      Reply

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