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Tamagoyaki (Japanese Egg Rolls)

   

Tamagoyaki Recipe

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This is a savoury recipe for Japanese egg rolls. I often eat it on its own as a satisfying and filling low-carb meal. It also goes well as a side dish to complement almost any meal.

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The key ingredients such as eggs, carrots and shallots are common items in the kitchen pantry. You can adapt the ingredients according to what you have – sometimes I use ebikko (prawn roe) instead of carrots, and baby spinach instead of spring onions.

I struggled to describe the steps of rolling the egg in words, so I made a two-minute video for this recipe. This is my first video so there is much room for improvement, but hopefully it conveyed the key steps of rolling the omelette. If you would like to see more video recipes, thumbs up the video on YouTube and subscribe to my channel. Thank you!

                                           

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21 Responses to “Tamagoyaki (Japanese Egg Rolls)”

  1. tigerfish — December 20, 2013 @ 1:04 pm

    This is almost like a more beautiful way to enjoy Chinese-style egg omelette!
    I cannot have just this on its own – not enough!!! more like a side dish to me :)

    Very professional !

    Reply

    • wiffy replied: — December 22nd, 2013 @ 12:08 am

      I will eat it on its own as a low-carb lunch once in a while when I’m watching my diet. thanks, much room for improvement :)

      Reply

  2. juhuacha — December 20, 2013 @ 6:42 pm

    I understand the steps better after watching the video. Thanks.

    Reply

    • wiffy replied: — December 22nd, 2013 @ 12:06 am

      thank you :)

      Reply

  3. Mandy — December 22, 2013 @ 1:17 pm

    Hi thanks for the video! may i ask where can i get dashi stock in singapore? thank you!!

    Reply

  4. tunadip — December 30, 2013 @ 9:27 pm

    You make it look so easy! WIll this work too with a round non-stick pan?

    Reply

  5. pei — January 1, 2014 @ 9:21 am

    have been following you for two years ago and just want to say good job!!! following your instructions always works :)
    thanks for sharing tips and the lovely recipes!
    x

    Reply

    • wiffy replied: — January 1st, 2014 @ 8:23 pm

      thank you, you are too kind :)

      Reply

  6. Cat — January 16, 2014 @ 7:41 am

    Love the video, thanks for sharing! Your tamagoyaki are much neater. :) I usually just pour all the eggs at one time then roll. I’m too lazy :D

    Reply

    • wiffy replied: — January 17th, 2014 @ 3:30 pm

      as long as it works :)

      Reply

  7. B — January 22, 2014 @ 9:16 pm

    Each bite is full of flavour!

    Reply

  8. Audrey — April 7, 2014 @ 12:51 pm

    Hi there!
    May I know where you got your Tamayogaki Pan? And where to get powedered dashi?

    Thanks!
    Audrey

    Reply

    • wiffy replied: — April 9th, 2014 @ 11:13 am

      My Tamayogaki pan is ASD brand, I got it from Isetan Scotts at a sale, but it is commonly found everywhere (like Giant, CK Tangs etc). I personally find it quite lightweight and filmsy though, but it certainly is inexpensive and gets the work done.

      Reply

      • wiffy replied: — April 9th, 2014 @ 11:22 am

        as for the powdered dashi, you can buy it from the Japanese dried goods section of any supermarket (NTUC, Cold Storage etc). It’s usually in a bottled or box form.

  9. Yenn — April 24, 2014 @ 2:36 pm

    Can we omit the dashi stock?

    Reply

    • wiffy replied: — April 25th, 2014 @ 1:45 pm

      yup you can. It seasons the egg, so you can add a tiny bit more light soy sauce.

      Reply

  10. cquek — May 11, 2014 @ 11:12 pm

    Can’t wait to try! but what if I don’t have the Tamagoyaki pan (18 by 13 cm/7.25 by 5.10 in), can I use normal frying pan?

    Reply

    • wiffy replied: — May 15th, 2014 @ 9:28 pm

      Yes, you can use a square pan (if you have a happy call pan, you can use that but half the working area). If it’s a round pan, refer my previous comment reply for a youtube link guide.

      Reply