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Chinese Spinach in Superior Broth

   

Spinach in Superior Broth

Check Out: Stir-fried Chinese Spinach Recipe

Update (Nov 2013): First posted in Apr 2010, now updated with new photos & improved recipe.

I am calling this dish “spinach in superior broth” (上汤菠菜/苋菜) only because that is how our restaurants & zi char stalls name this dish. With a fancy name like that, of course the eateries charge premium for this dish, when the home-cooked version is actually inexpensive (under S$3!). What makes the home-cooked version “superior”, in my humble opinion, is the home-made ikan bilis stock which is natural and free from artificial flavourings & MSG. I love this dish thoroughly because it is both a vegetable and a soup dish in one. I make ikan bilis stock once a week and keep it in the fridge, so I have an instant soup base to whip this dish in a jiffy whenever I want to.

Spinach in Superior Broth

There are actually many variations for this dish – such as with wolfberries, salted eggs or a thicker soup (simply thicken the broth with cornstarch solution). Use your creativity to adapt this recipe!

                                           

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73 Responses to “Chinese Spinach in Superior Broth”

  1. krissy @ thefoodaddicts.com — April 14, 2010 @ 7:08 am

    wow, i’ve never heard of this dish before. i find it amusing that they call it “superior broth”. it definitely looks healthy. good stuff!

    Reply

    • wiffy replied: — April 17th, 2010 @ 5:51 pm

      yes it’s pretty amusing. Maybe the word “superior” sells better ;)

      Reply

  2. Reeni — April 14, 2010 @ 7:53 am

    I’m so impressed at how much work you put into creating the recipe! I never heard of this before but I bet it’s totally delicious. I love everything in it and it looks so bright and fresh.

    Reply

  3. tasteofbeirut — April 14, 2010 @ 8:05 am

    Oh what a fascinating recipe with the centuries-eggs and that green vivid spinach!

    Reply

  4. Ippo456 — April 14, 2010 @ 8:29 am

    Is kangkung the same as Chinese spinach? I’m confused because just by looking at your photos, they look like kangkung to me.

    Reply

    • wiffy replied: — April 14th, 2010 @ 9:12 am

      nono not the same. kang kung has sharper leaves and hollow stems … this is really spinach hehe

      Reply

  5. Memoria — April 14, 2010 @ 10:47 am

    What a beautiful dish!! Your photos are absolutely perfect and inviting.

    Reply

  6. MaryMoh — April 14, 2010 @ 2:27 pm

    Mmmm…delicious. I can eat the whole plate. Chinese spinach is my favourite. It’s so tender and delicious.

    Reply

  7. Pepy @ Indonesia Eats — April 14, 2010 @ 10:15 pm

    Wiffy, can I have without century eggs for my lunch, please?

    Reply

  8. kirbie — April 15, 2010 @ 2:37 am

    This looks delicious. I’m surprised I’ve never had it before at chinese restaurants. I’ve never seen century year old eggs used in a soup form. It’s an interesting combination of ingredients. I’ll have to try to make it sometime or look for it on the menu at a restaurant.

    Reply

  9. Sook @ My Fabulous Recipes — April 15, 2010 @ 5:18 am

    So healthy and delicious!

    Reply

  10. xiaoyen — April 15, 2010 @ 3:19 pm

    I haven’t had this soup for years! It sure is a great soup. I was running out of soup ideas and glad I stopped to check what’s cooking :)

    Reply

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