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Soy Milk

   

Soy Milk Recipe

Check Out: Chilled Soya Beancurd Recipe

I love soy bean milk, or locally known as “tau huey tzui” (豆奶/豆花水/豆浆). If I buy them from random stalls, they are usually quite diluted and tastes very syrupy.  There are nice ones like the Selegie and Rochor brands but they are not available everywhere. So I thought it will be nice to make my own organic and rich tasting soy bean milk. I always thought making soy bean milk is very difficult. But after trying it out, I realised it is much easier than I expected it to be.  It’s rewarding to enjoy home-made soy bean milk made with organic soy beans. The main ingredients are just soy beans, pandan leaves and rock sugar. You need basic tools like a blender and a muslin bag. This is a healthy and high protein drink and also suitable for the lactose-intolerant. Here is a detailed step-by-step photos recipe guide to demystify the making process. You can use your home-made soy milk to make a wholesome and all-natural chilled soya beancurd dessert.

Printable Recipe
Soy Milk Recipe Soak the soy beans in water overnight. After soaking, discard water and rinse a few rounds with water.
Soy Milk Recipe Place the beans in an electric blender and add water.
Soy Milk Recipe My blender (U-Like brand) came with a special filter add-on which is great for making soy bean milk – it has an inner filter to place the beans and the pulp will be contained inside the filter for convenience. However, you can use any type of blender and there is actually no need to purchase any special type of blender for making soy bean milk.
Soy Milk Recipe Whizz the soy bean and milk for at least 2 minutes, taking a break every 30 seconds to prevent the appliance from overheating.
Soy Milk Recipe Filter the milk through a fine sieve.
Soy Milk Recipe Now we have to do something about the pulp because it contains quite a bit of soy bean milk.
Soy Milk Recipe To do that, we need a coconut squeezer bag – basically a cloth filter/muslin bag with fine holes.
Soy Milk Recipe Place the pulp in the bag and squeeze it to extract the remaining milk in the pulp.
Soy Milk Recipe You can see the photo for the difference in the pulp before and after squeezing. After squeezing, the pulp is dry and compact.
Soy Milk Recipe If you want extra smooth soya bean milk, sieve the milk mixture a few more times then transfer to a pot (I’m using a wok).
Soy Milk Recipe Add pandan leaves for extra fragrance. Bring to a gentle simmer (not boiling or the milk will curd) over medium low heat for about 10 minutes, stirring with a ladle regularly. After simmering, add rock sugar to taste and stir until they dissolve.
 Soy Milk Recipe Enjoy your home-made, organic soya bean milk. Drink warm or chilled. Due to the absence of preservatives, the longest I have kept it refrigerated is overnight. It should keep for 1 to 2 days.
                                           

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89 Responses to “Soy Milk”

  1. pigpigscorner — November 15, 2010 @ 8:49 pm

    The blender is cool! and I like how you added pandan. Great flavours!

    Reply

  2. Wendy — November 16, 2010 @ 12:06 pm

    I heard that Korean grandmothers made a dish out of the left over soy bean paste and sold it at the market. No one seems to hear this dish any more.

    Reply

  3. Little Inbox — November 16, 2010 @ 4:21 pm

    My sister is the one who make a huge batch of soy bean milk and deliver to us for free, hehe…I’m so lucky.

    Reply

    • wiffy replied: — November 16th, 2010 @ 4:50 pm

      Yes you’re so lucky! I’m jealous ;)

      Reply

  4. Lia Chen — November 16, 2010 @ 5:00 pm

    My mom loves to make the homemade soy bean milk for us. I’m just too comfortable because she always send a big bottle for us hehehe … I saw green soy bean milk before when I traveled to Melbourne. The flavor is pandan. Any idea how to add that green color?

    Reply

    • wiffy replied: — November 16th, 2010 @ 5:04 pm

      lucky you! for the green colour, you can use a pair of kitchen scissors to snip the pandan to smallish pieces, then add the snipped leaves with a bit of water in a blender to get pandan juice :D

      Reply

    • Lizzie Slothouber replied: — July 15th, 2013 @ 8:34 am

      In Australia – the pandan essence is purchasable in a little plastic bottle. Its a thick green liquid .. and hence most probably how the soy bean milk is green.

      It is very difficult to grow your own pandan plant here – as it doesn’t like frost … I note that your post is from 2010 – and it’s 15 July 2013 – it’s STILL difficult to get pandan leaves here.. and the essence is not the same ..

      Lizzie – Perth, West Australia.

      Reply

  5. shirley@kokken69 — November 16, 2010 @ 6:13 pm

    We don’t do it so much here but in China, every household has one of these blenders… I know of some health freaks who would insist on using only organic soya beans to make the milk.

    Reply

    • wiffy replied: — November 16th, 2010 @ 9:06 pm

      I use organic soya beans to make the milk too. Mainly because it’s affordable so might as well. one packet only 4 bucks :D

      Reply

  6. maameemoomoo — November 16, 2010 @ 7:32 pm

    I used to make soya beans myself years back… Now, i don’t even know where the machine is! Hahaha!! But one thing though, i remember vividly about this particular raw taste in the soy milk.. Is yours like that too?

    ps : i had grilled saba fish for dinner again tonight! ^_^

    Reply

    • wiffy replied: — November 16th, 2010 @ 9:04 pm

      No raw taste … did you simmer the soy milk before drinking? From what I know, need to do that before drinking.

      I have to make the grilled saba soon, I kept craving for it after seeing your beautiful photos :)

      Reply

  7. Xiaolu @ 6 Bittersweets — November 18, 2010 @ 4:57 am

    Great tutorial! I can remember how much I loved having soybean milk with youtiao in China growing up. When I first tried the soymilk here that is more sweetened, flavored, and processed I was severely let down. Thankfully I can buy fresh Asian-style soymilk now but fresh is surely the best!

    Reply

  8. Sandovaal — November 21, 2010 @ 11:11 pm

    Does anyone know where I can buy a good soybean maker in Singapore?
    Can’t seem to find it anywhere. I have one from China but it only makes enough for 4 people each time.

    Reply

  9. Janet @Gourmet Traveller 88 — November 22, 2010 @ 1:14 am

    I think i need to get a soybean milk machine too!

    Reply

  10. Sherri — December 2, 2010 @ 11:32 pm

    Hi,

    Where can i buy the coconut squeezer bag in Singapore?

    Reply

    • wiffy replied: — December 3rd, 2010 @ 8:30 pm

      Hi Sherri, you can find it in many places in Singapore – such as groceries shops especially those which sells crockery and kitchen tools, Japan Home etc…

      Reply

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