Noob Cook Recipes



What's
New
Tuna Pasta Recipe Dijon Honey Chicken Wings Recipe Beef Claypot Rice Recipe How to Make Grated Ginger Juice Ginger Grater Singapore Char Kway Teow Recipe

Steamed Mui Choy with Pork Belly

   

Steamed Mui Choy with Pork Belly

Check Out: Braised Pork Belly Recipe (Tau Yu Bak)

Steamed Mui Choy with Pork Belly (Mei Cai Kou Rou/梅菜扣肉)is a Hakka delight and although quite tedious to prepare the traditional way, it is not difficult. The tedious part comes from prepping the mustard greens (mui choy/mei cai) to thoroughly get rid of fine sand particles. My method of cleaning the mustard greens (blanching in boiling water and soaking) is taught by the market auntie who sold them to me and it is quick & effective. Another process is to deep-fry the pork and then plunging it in an ice water bath before steaming, but it is well worth the extra step because it results in a better texture. Prepare a bigger pot with the intention of leftovers as this dish keeps well.

Steamed Mui Choy with Pork Belly

There are typically two methods of preparing this dish – simmering or steaming. I did both ways for the sake of experimentation and I preferred the traditional method of steaming because the mustard greens retain their shape and flavour better. This dish is really savoury and goes so well with anything – rice, porridge or steamed buns. The result is well worth all the work, I must say.

                                           

Leave a Comment





27 Responses to “Steamed Mui Choy with Pork Belly”

  1. Angie@Angiesrecipes — September 5, 2011 @ 12:50 pm

    One more bowl of rice, please! This looks heavenly!

    Reply

  2. Chris — September 5, 2011 @ 2:18 pm

    I love the mei cai but cant say so for the pork. I love to have the gravy and mei cai on top of my rice – yum, yum.

    Reply

  3. mochachocolatarita — September 5, 2011 @ 4:34 pm

    i think my grandpa used to cook this a lott….your pork belly look wonderful!

    Reply

  4. Caca — September 7, 2011 @ 10:48 am

    now only I know there are 2 types of mui-choy in it. I always thought mui-choy is just mui-choy.

    Reply

  5. Sophia — February 7, 2012 @ 9:12 am

    Love this dish and am hoping to make it soon. When you say “steaming bowl”, can I use something like the clay pot as pictured, and put water in a pot to steam? Thank you for the advice in advance! :)

    Reply

    • wiffy replied: — February 7th, 2012 @ 3:06 pm

      yes you can, or any bowl you have at home which can withstand the high heat of steaming. Good luck!

      Reply

      • sophia replied: — February 7th, 2012 @ 3:07 pm

        Thank you! It turned out great – my first time. Awesome recipe and directions. Can’t wait to make it again. :)

  6. Chef Thyme — February 28, 2012 @ 11:02 pm

    I made this last night as I was craving for some local Chinese food. Your instruction is clear and the food turned out delicious.
    I moved to USA 3 years ago and this dish really make me feel st home.
    thank you do much and happy cooking.

    Reply

  7. brian cheong — May 9, 2012 @ 7:29 pm

    Hi, thks for the recipe however in the marinating reicpe i added some oyster sauce and sugar it turns out good too. My wife like it. Thks again

    Reply

  8. dvdhen — August 22, 2012 @ 8:58 pm

    wow this is a lovely meal to cook on weekend…

    Reply

  9. bochup1 — October 24, 2012 @ 3:22 pm

    what other dishes can go with this?

    Reply

    • wiffy replied: — October 24th, 2012 @ 3:33 pm

      For mains, both rice and porridge will go well. For side dishes or soups, I would say anything Chinese!

      Reply

  10. Anita @ Daily Cooking Quest — September 16, 2013 @ 9:02 pm

    My hubby favorite dish. His grandma used to make this all the time, but sadly she has passed away last year. I have been trying to find this recipe for a while now, definitely will give this a try :)

    Reply

Trackbacks/Pingbacks