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Ikan Bilis Powder

   

Ikan bilis powder

Get this recipe on the next page >>

One of most rewarding things about keeping a recipes blog is that I get to learn many neat tricks and tips from my readers. When I posted my recipe for ikan bilis (anchovies) stock a while back, a reader lynette shared this awesome idea:

“I hate the freezer space that the anchovies takes so I bake them and then use the blender to turn them into ikan bilis powder. It’s my secret ingredient to all my soups. A giant plastic bag turns into a handy small jar. We use the ikan bilis that has been cleaned (i.e. without the heads and entrails) as it has a lower cholesterol content but retains its calcium value.”

You May Also Like: Ikan Bilis Stock Recipe

and then adding on to this comment, another reader jsager shared:

“With ikan bilis in powder form, there is no waste or boiled-out ikan bilis to throw away. More importantly, if the backbone has not been removed (as happens in some of the super clean ikan bilis you find in the stores nowadays), you will get a very healthy dose of good calcium, that most of us are short of.”

Grinder Blades

Grinder Blades

I was sold. I embarked on making the ikan bilis powder with the help of my oven and electric grinder, finding the process satisfying and effortlessly easy. This is a great condiment for porridge (baby food!) and also a secret ingredient for many Chinese dishes, particularly soup and stir fries. These ikan bilis have a naturally sweet and salty taste that complements many types of savoury dishes.

Printable Recipe >>

(with oven temperature, measurements and printable view)

 Step by Step Description
Rinsing Ikan Bilis (Anchovies) First, rinse the ikan bilis (anchovies) in a few changes of water. This will reduce the excess saltiness. Ikan bilis come in vary degrees of saltiness depending on the type you buy and as a general guide, I recommend rinsing them in two changes of water; but if your ikan bilis is the extra-salty variety, you may need another 1-2 rinses. At the same time, do not over-rinse the ikan bilis; the ikan bilis powder needs to be quite salty to work its magic as a seasoning condiment.
Baking Ikan Bilis After washing the ikan bilis, pat dry on paper towels and arrange them one flat layer on a baking tray. For best results, allow to air dry before baking in the oven.
4982990168_011f96627c_o Bake the ikan bilis in the oven for about 10 – 15 minutes (oven temperature are at the printable recipe on page two; link above), until the ikan bilis have just turned a light brown shade (see above). Use a spatula to stir and spread them evenly.
Baked Ikan Bilis Return to oven and continue baking for another 10 minutes, or until the ikan bilis turn a shade of golden brown, as seen in the photo above. At this point, they are crispy and makes a great snack or a savoury topping for many Chinese dishes.
Grinder Pulse the baked ikan bilis in an electric grinder until they become powder. If you do not have an electric grinder, you can see a mortar and pestle to pound them.
Ikan Bilis Powder What you get is fine ikan bilis powder which is very versatile – you can use it as a condiment for plain porridge or as a secret seasoning ingredient in many types of dishes (such as soups and stir fries). Store in an air tight container in a cool and dry place (such as the fridge).
                                           

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84 Responses to “Ikan Bilis Powder”

  1. mama22boys — September 13, 2010 @ 10:51 pm

    How long can we store the powder? Store in fridge? Thanks :)

    Reply

  2. Shirley@kokken69 — September 13, 2010 @ 11:00 pm

    This is one of the most useful posts I have come across in a long while. I used to buy these powder in Thailand but making this yourself beats store bought any time! Thanks for sharing this!

    Reply

    • wiffy replied: — September 13th, 2010 @ 11:21 pm

      thanks for your kind words Shirley. Yes home made is definitely good if we can afford the time, at least we know no MSG or preservatives :)

      Reply

  3. Xiaolu @ 6 Bittersweets — September 14, 2010 @ 1:17 am

    How interesting! I’ve never heard of this before, but it sounds like a great idea. I especially like the added calcium from leaving in the bones.

    Reply

  4. Big Boys Oven — September 14, 2010 @ 1:21 am

    wow now I know what to do with my anchovies rather with sambal! thanks for sharing! :)

    Reply

  5. petite nyonya — September 14, 2010 @ 9:06 am

    what a super idea! thanks to you & other bloggers who gave this tip, I’m gonna do this too since i got cleaned ikan bilis in my fridge now.

    Reply

  6. maameemoomoo — September 14, 2010 @ 10:38 am

    I love this one!!!

    I used to make this so very often when my boys are babies! I just add this to their porridge / soup/ etc as ‘au naturel salt!’.

    Maybe it’s time for me to re-make this again. Do away the salt! ;)

    Reply

    • wiffy replied: — September 15th, 2010 @ 11:07 pm

      I like how you call it ‘au naturel salt’ … sounds more gourmet and high class, lol

      Reply

  7. food-4tots — September 14, 2010 @ 1:27 pm

    Thanks for all the neat treats and tips!! Very handy to a lazy mom like me. Love it!

    Reply

  8. juhuacha — September 14, 2010 @ 2:00 pm

    Thanks for the step by step guide. At least now I know what goes into my powder unlike store bought. Would love to try this once I get my blender. Still cant make up my mind between U like and magic bullet. Is it as user friendly as demostrated in shopping centre?

    Reply

    • wiffy replied: — September 15th, 2010 @ 11:13 pm

      seriously, I didn’t know there are two brands in the market – shows how little research I have done before I bought it. It is really simple to use when pulvarizing powder or grinding chilli paste. For crushing ice for example ice mocha, it’s a bit harder (to me) because I still have pieces of ice left. I think need experience to get the right ratio of milk and ice, or have to use smaller ice cubes. The blender also comes with another attachment for making soy bean milk (one of my upcoming recipes)… it’s convenient but of course not as effective as the traditional way of squeezing with cheese cloth. To me, overall it’s quite a good blender, easy to clean and I like the compact size. hee, maybe I should do a review for it on my reviews page :)

      Reply

  9. Jun Indochine Kitchen — September 14, 2010 @ 4:49 pm

    I have never had this before, but my mother always made for my sister’s babies. I didn’t know that we can actually use it in our food. Haha I thought they are baby food :) She did it the same way you did. I must try!

    Reply

    • wiffy replied: — September 15th, 2010 @ 11:14 pm

      yes this is “baby food” but adults can enjoy too, very yummy and healthy :D

      Reply

  10. Juliana — September 15, 2010 @ 2:46 am

    Love you step-by-step pictures…the powdered anchovies look so tasty…love it with porridge :-)

    Reply

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