Noob Cook Recipes



What's
New
Dijon Honey Chicken Wings Recipe Beef Claypot Rice Recipe How to Make Grated Ginger Juice Ginger Grater Singapore Char Kway Teow Recipe Philips Airfryer Giveaway

Ginseng Chrysanthemum Tea

   

Ginseng Chrysanthemum Tea
Ginseng Chrysanthemum Tea 洋参菊花茶

I love American ginseng and because of its inherent cooling properties, it is a perfect ingredient in hot and humid Singapore. The one I used is the inexpensive type called American ginseng “fibers” or “beards” which are small, thin and wispy looking. You can easily get a packet for less than S$10 here. This type of ginseng is frequently used for cooking dishes such as ginseng chicken soup and foil-wrapped steamed ginseng with chicken, but you can also make a cooling herbal tea with it. In this recipe, ginseng is paired with chrysanthemum flowers, a popular combination. This is a great tasting and cooling herbal drink which is ultra refreshing especially in hot weather.

Ginseng & Chrysanthemum Flowers
American Ginseng, 洋参须 & Chrysanthemum Flowers (
菊花)

A well known property of this ginseng is that it is very ‘cooling’. So consuming it will supposedly reduce your body “heatiness” (降火). It is also known to keep one mentally alert (提神), therefore you should avoid consuming this this drink too close to bedtime. Read more about American ginseng fiber here. As for Chrysanthemum, it is known to be cooling, thirst-quenching and detoxifying. This is one healthy Chinese herbal drink to make now and then for the family.

Ingredients
(Serves 2)

- 50g chrysanthemum flowers (菊花/朵朵香)
- 30g American Ginseng “Fibers” or “Beards”(洋参须)
- 2 litres of water
- 70g rock sugar (adjust according to taste)

Directions
1. Bring chrysanthemum flowers and water to a boil in a pot. Reduce heat and simmer for less than a minute. Take out the chrysanthemum using a strainer.
2. Add ginseng and simmer for another 5 minutes. Take out ginseng using a strainer.
3. Add rock sugar to taste and off fire when the sugar has dissolved. Serve the drink at room temperature or chilled.

Cooking Notes
1. If you do not want to use a strainer, you can put the ginseng and chrysanthemum flowers in disposable soup pouches and discard the entire pouch after simmering.

Similar Recipes
- Canadian Ginseng, Chrysanthemum and Wolfberries Tea
- Ginseng Tea

More Cooling Tea Recipes
- Chrysanthemum Tea
- Lemon Barley Drink
- Water Chestnut and Bamboo Drink

                                           

Leave a Comment





30 Responses to “Ginseng Chrysanthemum Tea”

  1. Steamy Kitchen — November 8, 2008 @ 6:24 am

    Lovely photo! Great composition and lighting.

    Reply

  2. Katie — November 8, 2008 @ 7:56 am

    Yum, I love tea. I am actually drinking a cup right now!

    I’m glad you’re feeling better from your surgery :-)

    Reply

  3. Jun — November 8, 2008 @ 12:00 pm

    I am really impressed! I am such a noob when it comes to chinese / any kind of medicinal herbs. I just drink / eat whatever I am told off by my mother.

    I hope you feel better soon.

    Reply

  4. beachloverkitchen — November 8, 2008 @ 2:33 pm

    now you make me wanna to make some of this american gingseng drink! ouch! now you remind me of WHB!!

    Reply

  5. Marysol — November 8, 2008 @ 3:02 pm

    Well, now I’m on a quest for ginseng.

    NC, I’m glad you’re feeling better.

    Reply

  6. tigerfish — November 8, 2008 @ 5:45 pm

    Congrats on the win! You are HOT!…now need more American Ginseng? ;p

    Reply

  7. Ning — November 8, 2008 @ 9:11 pm

    Congratulations on your win! See? That is why I crowned you master chef already! :) I love chrysanthemum tea and american ginseng drink, but I’ve never combined them together yet. Thanks for the idea! :)

    Reply

  8. wiffy — November 10, 2008 @ 9:07 am

    Hi everyone… thanks for your kind words … I’m so touched :XO:

    Tastes of Home, oh dear, hope I didn’t scare you. Don’t worry, mine was a special difficult case … even got an expert to do the extraction for me because he specialises in difficult ones XD

    Reply

  9. Kalyn — November 10, 2008 @ 10:30 am

    Very interesting. I didn’t realize there were so many types of ginseng. Hope you’re feeling better!

    Reply

  10. smallsmallbaker — November 10, 2008 @ 2:42 pm

    Hi, I have tagged you for a meme. Check out my blog and have fun!

    Reply

Trackbacks/Pingbacks